ELOISA JAMES

I write romances--21 New York Times bestsellers, highest position #5 (tied for #4, but who's counting?). My latest novel is Three Weeks with Lady X. I'm a Shakespeare professor in real life. Curious about romance or the business of writing? Ask me something!

​So You Want to Get Into Romance Novels. Start Here!

julescourt:

I cannot recommend Jennifer Cruisie enough, especially “Welcome to Temptation”, “Faking It”, and “Bet Me”. She was my gateway drug into the romance genre.

estoriasdacarochinha:


Arthur Rackham “Undine” (1909) - sprite by Plum leaves on Flickr.
Arthur Rackham (English, 1867-1939) leading ‘Golden Age’ illustrator. “Undine” (novella) by Friedrich de la Motte FouquéI - Undine, a water spirit, marries a knight in order to gain a soul. Contains some themes similar to “The Little Mermaid” by Hans Christian Andersen. Read online: archive.org/stream/undine00lamo#page/n7/mode/2up


This is so beautiful, and simple.   High-res

estoriasdacarochinha:

Arthur Rackham “Undine” (1909) - sprite by Plum leaves on Flickr.

Arthur Rackham (English, 1867-1939) leading ‘Golden Age’ illustrator.



“Undine” (novella) by Friedrich de la Motte FouquéI - Undine, a water spirit, marries a knight in order to gain a soul. Contains some themes similar to “The Little Mermaid” by Hans Christian Andersen.



Read online: archive.org/stream/undine00lamo#page/n7/mode/2up

This is so beautiful, and simple.

positivelyaustentatious:

 In Regency times postage for  letters was paid by the sheet of paper, so the usual amount for a letter was one quarto sheet (15” x 9”) - it was folded over to make two leaves, or four pages. To save money people ‘crossed’ their letter so they didn’t need to pay for an extra sheet - They wrote first one way then turned it  a quarter round and then the other.  There were no ready made envelopes, so the name and address was written in the middle of the fourth page and then the paper was then folded in three and sealed with wax or a small moistened blob of dried glue.

As the recipient paid for the letter, sometimes the writer would hide a small coin under the seal for use in payment.